Home » Posts tagged "History of Herbs" (Page 4)

Borage herbal plant and its culinary and medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Borage-(Borago officinalis) Boraginaceae Annul Although borage is an annual, itself sows prolifically and often its grey green foliage and modestly bowed heads of sky- blue flowers and fat buds, softy misted with downy calyxes, appear in unexpected corners of the garden. We let it grow in unusual places because somehow it always seems to be the most harmonious filling for patches of garden that could have been uninteresting. Now and...

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Bergamot herbal plant and its culinary and medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Bergamot-(Monarda didyma) Labiatae Perennial     This native of North America is one of the most sweetly fragrant herbs. It has mint- like foliage and honeyed heads of tousled blossoms. Propagation is by seed or root division, and sometimes cuttings, in spring, the best position for the plant is where the roots will be cool in summer, and  whose the 1.20 m (4ft) stems can catch  the sun. it is ideally...

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Bay Tree herbal plant and its culinary and medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Bay Tree-(Laurus nobilis) Lauraceae Perennial The noble bay tree is native to the Mediterranean countries and grows to a height of at least 11 m (40ft) in good quality soil in a n open, sunny position. The pungent leaves flavour certain foods. Both leaves and berries yield and oil which has many uses in herbal medicine propagation is by sowing seed or by taking cuttings in spring. Cuttings are a...

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Basil herbal plant and its culinary and medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Basil-(Ocimum basilicum) Labiatae Annul Basil, together with French tarragon, is one of the most highly regarded culinary herbs. It is propagated by sowing seeds in late spring or early summer. An earlier sowing will often end in disappointment, for a late cold snap will kill the tender new plants overnight. All of the many varieties prefer a sunny, sheltered position in light to sandy, well- drained soil. Sweet basil (Ocimum...

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Balm herbal plant and its culinary and medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Balm-(Melissa officinalis) Labiatae Perennial This refreshingly lemon- scented herb is propagated by seeds, cuttings, and root division in spring, and in temperate climates again in autumn. It likes moist, rich soil and sunshine for part of the day. It grows to 75 cm (2 ½ ft) or more, depending on soil and rain fall. Although a member of the mint family, the shallow roots of balm (or lemon balm as...

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Anise herbal plant and its culinary and medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Anise-(Pimpinella anisum) Umbelliferae Annual Anise is a small, parsley – like plant 45- 60 cm (1 ½ -2 ft) high with serrated leaves that have a warmly aromatic taste. The flat, white flower heads are followed by intensely fragrant fruit or seeds which ripen to a brown colour and have the typical aniseed flavour. The plant prefers a sheltered, sunny position in light, well- drained soil. Propagation is by seed...

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Angelica herbal plant and its culinary, medicinal properties-History of Herbs

Angelica archangelica-Umbelliferae Biennial Angelica has been described as one of the “stately” herbs. It grows to 1.5- 2m (5-8ft) and is one of the tallest herbs not classified as a shrub or a small tree. The whole plant exudes a fine, sweetish fragrance but is it more pronounced in the hollow, bronze green stems and stalks. The large, round, creamy- lime flower heads bloom in spring, usually in their second...

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History of Herbs

History of Herbs The history and romance of herbs is wreathed in the dim mists of time to intrigue and enchant us. Herbs are mentioned in the Bible many times in both the Old and New Testaments. They also appear in Greek mythology, fennel being an example. Legend has it that the god Prometheus went up to heaven holding a hollow fennel stalk in which he concealed some of the...

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