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Common colds

Definition:

The common cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory system, including the nose, throat, sinuses, eustachian tubes, trachea, larynx, and bronchial tubes. Although more than 200 different viruses can cause a cold, 30-50% are caused by a group known as rhinoviruses. Almost all colds clear up in less than two weeks without complications.

Signs & Symptoms:

Symptoms of a common cold usually appear one to three days after exposure to a cold-causing virus. Signs and symptoms, which can vary from person to person, might include:

Runny or stuffy nose

Sore throat

Cough

Congestion

Slight body aches or a mild headache

Sneezing

Low-grade fever

Generally feeling unwell (malaise)

The discharge from your nose may become thicker and yellow or green in color as a common cold runs its course. This isn’t an indication of a bacterial infection.

Cause:

Although many types of viruses can cause a common cold, rhinoviruses are the most common culprit.

A cold virus enters your body through your mouth, eyes or nose. The virus can spread through droplets in the air when someone who is sick coughs, sneezes or talks.

It also spreads by hand-to-hand contact with someone who has a cold or by sharing contaminated objects, such as utensils, towels, toys or telephones. If you touch your eyes, nose or mouth after such contact or exposure, you’re likely to catch a cold.

How To Cure:

  1. Hot Ginger Tea

This is one of the best teas to sip when you’re feeling stuffed up and yucky. The ginger is delicious, warming, a just a little spicy. Aromatic constituents such as capsaicin (found in chilies) or piperine (found in black pepper) are part of a family of compounds that provide numerous healing benefits. In ginger the compound of that family is called gingerol (original, right), and it helps relieve congestion in a couple of ways. First, it lessens inflammation of mucous membranes that line the nasal passages and the sinus cavity, and this inflammation contributes greatly to the buildup of pressure and congestion. When the swelling goes down, mucous can flow out instead of getting all jammed up. Although slightly less scientific, there’s also the fact that its spiciness has enough of a kick that it can just perfectly loosen up built up phlegm. The tea itself is wonderful for you because you’re getting extra fluids, which your body needs desperately when fighting off an illness, and breathing in the steam vapors can also help loosen up any congestion you may be expecting. The below recipe is for an infusion, rather than a decoction (which is when you actively steep the herb in simmering water), but you can do either or.

You will need

-6-8 tablespoons of freshly grated ginger root

-A pinch of cinnamon (optional)

-A squirt of lemon juice (optional)

-A dash of honey (optional)

-4 cups of freshly boiled water

-A glass jar (at least 1 quart)

Directions

Place the ginger in a 1 quart glass and sprinkle in some cinnamon if you are using it. Bring the water to a rolling boil, and then carefully pour it into the jar to cover the ginger. Steep for 30-40 minutes, and be sure to cover your jar-this is important because it keeps all that evaporating essential oil goodness right where it belongs-in your cup! Strain (use hot mitts or a towel as the jar may still be quite warm) and then pour yourself a piping fresh mug. You may find that you want to reheat the tea slightly. Add honey and lemon if you are using them, sip and savor, and be sure to breathe in the steam. Store the rest of the tea in the fridge for up to 24 hours, reheating and drinking 3 times throughout the day.

  1. Essential Steam

One beautiful almost instant fix for a stuffy nose is to steam it out. This is a favorite remedy of mine and worth repeating in numerous remedy lists. You can glean the benefits of steam by breathing it in from a mug of hot tea, taking a hot shower, or filling a bowl with a hot water and adding an essential oil. The best essential oils to use for this are the strong ones like tea tree, peppermint, or eucalyptus (tea tree and eucalyptus being the best in my opinion.) The anti-bacterial/anti-viral properties of tea tree oil can be carried via the steam, which will help fight off any bug that youre battling. Both tea tree and eucalyptus are, of course, rather strong smelling, which also helps dislodge congestion.

You will need

-5-10 drops of eucalyptus, tea tree oil, or a combination

-A heatproof bowl

-Boiling water

-A towel

 

Directions

Put the essential oils in the bottom of the bowl and then pour in several cups of boiling water. Start by putting your face over the bowl at a comfortable distance-steam can do some damage if you aren’t careful. Eventually have your face directly about the bowl as close as comfortably possible. Drape the towel over your head to trap all that healing steam, and take deep breaths. Resurface as needed if you become too warm. Have some tissues handy to blow your nose after! Repeat 2-3 times daily, adjusting the amount of essential oil to your preferences. Some people find that too much will make their eyes water, so start with less.

  1. Chest Salve

There’s a good recipe for making your own vapor rub here, but this simple blend can be whipped up in a hurry if you’re running short on time, ingredients, or just feel to crummy to do anything else. While I prefer the former recipe, this works well if you just want a little something to use in conjunction with a hot water bottle (see below.) The menthol in the essential oil is what creates the cooling sensation that makes you feel like you can breathe easier, even when you’re all stuffed up.

You will need

-1/2 cup of coconut oil

-15 drops of peppermint essential oil

-An airtight container

 

Directions

Over a double boiler, melt down the coconut oil. Remove from the heat and pour it into a heat safe airtight container. Add the essential oils, stir, and seal off while it cools. Once it has completely cooled, simply rub a little on your chest or under your nose (be careful not touch your eyes-I have rubbed peppermint essential oil in my eye before and it is not pleasant!) This will keep in a cool dark place out of direct sunlight up to 3 years.

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